RSS

July 2020 Technical Society ZOOM meeting!

When the power grid goes down, that is not the time to be reading by candlelight and trying to decide what to do.

The technical Society speaker on July 13, 2020 will be Dr. Leon Tolbert who will speak on the Reconfigurable Power Grid Emulator . The meeting will be on ZOOM starting at 11:55 AM.

Dr. Tolbert conducts research in utility applications of power electronics including microgrids, interface with renewable energy sources, medium voltage multilevel converters incorporating silicon carbide power devices, and electric vehicles.  

This presentation will describe a power electronics based hardware testbed that can emulate an electric grid’s generation, loads, storage, and transmission network and perform several real-time scenarios while incorporating real measurement, control, communication, estimation, and actuation in the system.  The system can be used to represent faults, future grids with high levels of renewable penetration, and a multi-terminal HVDC overlay.  

The testbed has been used to represent a future North American grid model that has high penetration levels of renewables (>80%) and also for representing a distribution-level microgrid that has a flexible boundary and multiple points of grid connection.  The tool has been useful in developing control, protection, and measurements needed for the future electric grid.

Also, a brief introduction will be provided about the NSF/DOE Engineering Research Center headquartered at The University of Tennessee called CURENT (Center for Ultrawide-area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission Network).  The goals of CURENT are to develop controls and technology that enable the integration of a high penetration level of renewables into the electric transmission network and to enable wide area monitoring, control, and actuation of the U.S. electric grid.  

Leon M. Tolbert received the Bachelor’s, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech. He worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, from 1991 until 1999 on electric distribution and power quality projects. He joined the University of Tennessee in 1999, and he is currently the Min H. Kao Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a founding member for the NSF/DOE Engineering Research Center, CURENT (Center for Ultra-wide-area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission Networks). He is also an adjunct participant with the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center, ORNL. 


Leon M. Tolbert received his Bachelor’s of Electrical Engineering with highest honors in 1989, his M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1991, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1999 from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.He joined the Engineering Divisio of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1991 and worked on several electrical distribution and power quality projects at the three U.S. Department of Energy plants in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In 1997, he became a Research Engineer in the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Some of his projects included thermal and efficiency modeling for hybrid electric vehicles, development of multilevel inverter PWM methods, and testing methods to approximate electric machine efficiency.In 1999, he was appointed as an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville where he is presently the Min H. Kao Professor in the Min H. Kao Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He served as the Department Head from 2013 through 2018. He does research in the areas of power electronics, application of WBG (SiC and GaN) power devices, multilevel converters, electric vehicles, interface with renewable and distributed energy resources, and reactive power compensation and active filters. He is a founding member and thrust leader for CURENT, the NSF/DOE Engineering Research Center established at UT in 2011. He is also a faculty member in the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education (CIRE) .Dr. Tolbert is also an adjunct participant at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center. He is a Registered Professional Engineer in the state of Tennessee, a Fellow of the IEEE, and a member of the IEEE Industry Applications SocietyIEEE Power Electronics SocietyIEEE Power and Energy Society, and IEEE Industrial Electronics Society. He was the Review Chair for the Industry Power Converter Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications from 2014-2017. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics from 2007 – 2012, and was elected to be an At-Large Member of the IEEE Power Electronics Society Advisory Committee for 2010 – 2012. He was the Membership Chair for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2011-2012. He was the chairman of the Education Activities Committee of the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2003-2007. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the 2001 IEEE Industry Applications Society Outstanding Young Member Award. He has had six prize papers: second prize in 1992, first prize in 2006, and second prize in 2013 from the IEEE Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting, and a prize paper in 2009 from the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics. He has received the following awards at The University of Tennessee: the Charles Ferris Faculty Award in 2019, Moses A. and Mayme Brooks Distinguished Professor Award in 2010, Engineering Research Fellow Award in 2003, 2007, 2012, 2013, and 2017; Chancellor’s Citation for Research and Creative Achievement in 2016, Chancellor’s Multidisciplinary Research Award in 2012, and Chancellor’s Citation for Professional Promise in Research and Creative Achievement in 2003.



 
Comments Off on July 2020 Technical Society ZOOM meeting!

Posted by on June 12, 2020 in Meetings

 

June 2020 Technical Society Meeting

On June 8, 2020 the Technical Society of Knoxville will have its next ZOOM meeting. James Tente, Knoxville Building and Plans Review Chief: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)  will speak on the reduction of residential energy consumption through the Passive House.  

The ZOOM information for the June 8, 2020 meeting is below:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86437011973

Future programs (as circumstances dictate).


July 13: Prof. Dr. Tolbert  on Electrical Grid (tentative)

August 10: Dr. Jim Beaver on Earthquakes (tentative)

September 14

October 5: 


November 9



December 14: Meeting geared to 100. Birthday of the TSK. 

 
Comments Off on June 2020 Technical Society Meeting

Posted by on May 15, 2020 in Meetings

 

May 2020 Technical Society Meeting on Youtube!

www.youtube.com/channel/UC2jARiPIs59qIIXgoM6-K8w

COVID-19 and its Economic Impact

The speaker was Dr. Matthew Murray
Director of the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy
at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Dr. Murray talked about the formation and the mission of the  Coronavirus-19 Outbreak Response Experts (CORE-19) team, which is a network of researchers in public health, economics, public policy, agriculture, veterinary medicine, and other disciplines who seek to:
Provide timely and evidence-based information for policymakers, industry, and the public on pressing questions regarding the global pandemic.

Dr. Murray holds a joint appointment with the   Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy , the    Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research  (CBER) and the   Department of Economics  at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  He is responsible for implementing the mission and vision of the Baker Center.

Dr. Murray has worked closely with state and local governments on a wide range of public policy issues including economic development incentives and economic/fiscal impact analysis. His research focuses on public finance and public policy, state and local tax policy, education finance, tax compliance, and regional economic development.


 
Comments Off on May 2020 Technical Society Meeting on Youtube!

Posted by on May 10, 2020 in Meetings

 

A May 4,2020 Zoom Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville has Been Created – We Are Back!


After nearly one hundred years of
connecting, advising, and educating
Knoxville area leaders and professionals
in engineering and sciences,

The Technical Society of Knoxville

invites you to its first ever virtual online meeting on

Monday, May 4, 2020 at Noon

about COVID-19 and its Economic Impact

with

Dr. Matthew Murray
Director of the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy
at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The technical society is known for excellent programs aimed add informing members and the public. Since many people have not used ZOOM the following are instructions on how to connect, listen, and possibly participate.
!. At a couple of minutes before 12:00 PM Eastern on May 4, 2020 go to the web address: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89499986245 using a computer or cell phone2. Just “click” on https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89499986245
3.What happens next depends on whether you have previously successfully used ZOOM with whatever computer or cell phone you are using ( you will need a computer or cell phone).  If you have not previously used ZOOM you will be prompted to download the software. It is easy to download.
4. You will be connected to the meeting when it starts.5. Something will go wrong (at least it usually does for me) so just look at the screen and try to click on whatever makes it work (i.e.- use the Bob Scott method of computer mastery).To learn more about the Technical Society of Knoxville go to the website TechnicalSociety.netFeel free to call me if you want help , Bob Scott, 690-0705. Reply 

Dr. Murray will talk about the formation and the mission of the  Coronavirus-19 Outbreak Response Experts (CORE-19) team, which is a network of researchers in public health, economics, public policy, agriculture, veterinary medicine, and other disciplines who seek to:
Provide timely and evidence-based information for policymakers, industry, and the public on pressing questions regarding the global pandemic.

Dr. Murray holds a joint appointment with the   Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy , the    Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research  (CBER) and the   Department of Economics  at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  He is responsible for implementing the mission and vision of the Baker Center.

Dr. Murray has worked closely with state and local governments on a wide range of public policy issues including economic development incentives and economic/fiscal impact analysis. His research focuses on public finance and public policy, state and local tax policy, education finance, tax compliance, and regional economic development.

Dr. Murray has been leading the preparation of the annual
An Economic Report to the Governor of the State of Tennessee (short-term and long-term economic forecast), since 1996 and of the
Tennessee Economic Overview 
(monthly economic indicator series for Tennessee and its metropolitan areas) since 1994.
Dr. Murray’s most recent presentations to TSK were about “The Impact of Free Trade on US Business” and “The Growing National Debt.”

You are encouraged to visit the CORE-19 website well before the meeting to familiarize yourself with the format of the CORE-19 briefings and the other features of the website. It also contains an interactive COVID-19 Case Projection Calculator that you can download to explore your own ideas fore response scenarios or what might happen with some of the many “solutions” that have been circulated.

You are also encouraged to submit early questions for Dr. Murray to get a better chance to have them answered on Monday, or even addressed in more detail during the talk. Please email your question to  TSK-COVID-19@sustainably.net by 5:00 PM on Saturday, May 2,2020.

Why zoom?

Our need for caution is made obvious by the following excerpt from correspondence Technical Society member Jim Beavers had with a friend of his, John Schneider, a seismologist, who with his wife has been living in Italy since 2016 working for Global Earthquake Model (GEM), a world organization for earthquake modeling.

Dear Jim,

Very nice to hear from you and sorry for not responding sooner.  Smart move to go into quarantine for a month; hopefully that will be enough. Jill and I are well, but have been in a progressively deepening quarantine for nearly a month already, with 2 weeks of the current lockdown to go, and an almost certainty that it will be extended beyond that.  Needless to say, this situation occupies our minds to an obsessive degree.  We are constantly washing our hands and feel quite nervous leaving our apartment for any reason.  GEM remains functioning with all of us working remotely, mainly from home.

Below I share with you some of my observations and a bit of armchair analysis of the situation in Italy.

On 20 Feb, Italy recorded 3 cases, and on the 22nd there were 79 recorded cases and the first deaths occurred.  On the 23rd in Lombardia public events and the universities started shutting down and suspending or cancelling activities.  At GEM we started working from home and avoiding restaurants, bars and public transportation.  A few towns nearby went into lockdown. Note that this occurred the day after the first death in the country. 

By March 8th there were over 7000 cases in Italy and 4000 in Lombardia.  Lombardia went into lockdown and two days later, all of Italy, with only essential services open.    For the past two weeks the quarantine has meant we have been allowed to leave our homes only for essential purposes (e.g., food and medicine), and occasional exercise, but with strict observance of social distancing. We are subject to arrest if we are out without a self-declaration of purpose (a form we must fill out and sign everytime we leave the house).  Police patrol the streets to break up any gatherings.  The streets are empty, with the occasional person walking a dog or carrying groceries.  Abbracci (hugs) have been replaced by masks and furtive looks that say, “Don’t get near me”.  Despite the control measures, Italy is about to top 50,000 cases, with about 22,000 in Lombardia; and the death toll is over 4000, with 2500 in Lombardia alone.  Hospitals and morgues are over capacity.  The army was brought into Bergamo yesterday to carry away hundreds of bodies.  Yesterday, the government announced that all parks are now closed, so no more exercise, and the lockdown is going to be extended beyond the original 3 April deadline. 

Although the stats are grim, there is actually evidence that the lockdown is working to some degree.  Two weeks ago the doubling period for confirmed cases was about 3 days, and it is now extended to around 5 or 6 days nationally.  In the province of Pavia, the doubling period has extended to about 8 days.  Without the lockdown we would probably have 100,000 cases by now, instead of 50,000.  My guess is we will do well to limit the total cases to less than 100,000 at the end of the next two weeks, but to do that means getting the doubling rate to shift from 5 days to 30 days.  If we get there, we have to keep the pressure on to try to achieve some sort of steady state (x new cases per month) that can be managed.  I don’t see total containment, i.e., no new cases, possible for at least 2 months, and to do so means maintaining the strictest of quarantines.  Keep in mind that although 100,000 seems large, it is still under .2% of the population, so keeping the active cases to a minimum is critically important until, hopefully, we have a vaccine.

I hope this gives you some idea of what could happen where you are and the importance of observing the quarantine.  Stay well and take care of one another.  Sorry my news could not be more optimistic, but we are doing our best to stay out of the way. 

Best wishes,
John

Jim Beavers is an internationally recognized expert on buildings designed for withstanding earthquakes and he was scheduled to be the Technical Society speaker in May 2020. His presentation will be rescheduled at a later date.

The next scheduled Technical Society meeting will have James Tente, Chief of Building Inspections & Plans Review, as speaker on June 8, 2020. 

 
Comments Off on A May 4,2020 Zoom Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville has Been Created – We Are Back!

Posted by on March 22, 2020 in Meetings

 

The April 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville is Cancelled

Due to concerns about spreading of the virus , covid-19 , the April 2020 Technical Society meeting has been cancelled .

April 2020 will probably be the first month without a Technical Society meeting in 99 years. Information regarding future meetings will be posted on this webpage as soon as decisions are made.

 
Comments Off on The April 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville is Cancelled

Posted by on March 19, 2020 in Meetings

 

March 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

The Technical Society of Knoxville will meet on March 9, 2020 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 401 W Summit Hill Drive. Dr. Hongyu (Nick) Zhou, Professor, Tickle College of Engineering, UT will be the speaker. The title of his presentation will be ” The State of the Civil Engineering Infrastructure – national and local”.

Every four years, the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Report Card for America’s Infrastructure depicts the condition and performance of American infrastructure in the familiar form of a school report  card—assigning letter grades based on the physical condition and needed investments for improvement. The last grades for Tennessee are

AVIATION B-,  BRIDGES B, DAMS D,  DRINKING WATER C,  INLAND WATERWAYS C-,  PARKS C,  ROADS C+,  SCHOOLS C-,  TRANSIT D+,  WASTEWATER D+

Why these grades?  Come to the meeting for an educated perspective.

Dr. Zhou joined the University of Tennessee as an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in August 2019 . His research focuses on smart and energy-efficient building systems and built environment, with an emphasis on using innovative materials, designs, and cyber-physical technologies to improve the life-cycle performance of buildings and infrastructures.

The Technical Society of Knoxville is a group of persons interested in technology and science, and their effects on society, and in particular, on the community. Technical Society of Knoxville meetings are held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 401 W Summit Hill Drive and are open to the public.  Members and guests begin arriving around 11:30 AM and go through the buffet line. Cost is $13 per person payable in cash or by check in the meeting room to the designated collector. Cost without lunch is $7. A token for free parking in the hotel garage is included. Meetings are called to order at 11:55 and adjourned at 1:00 PM.

Anyone interested in the topic is welcome.

 
Comments Off on March 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

Posted by on February 17, 2020 in Meetings

 

February 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

The Technical Society of Knoxville will meet on February 10, 2020 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 401 W Summit Hill Drive.

Gerald Green, Executive Director, Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission, will be the speaker. He will provide a presentation that addresses new topics and issues. Gerald Green has a masters degree in urban planning from the University of Tennessee and he has worked in planning in Missouri and North Carolina before coming to Knox County in 2015.

The Technical Society of Knoxville was an early advocate of city planning (a major street plan for Knoxville was adopted in 1927). Anyone interested in the topic is welcome. 

This will be the annual meting of the Technical Society of Knoxville. Officers for 2020 will be elected.

 
Comments Off on February 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

Posted by on January 27, 2020 in Meetings

 

January 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

The Technical Society of Knoxville will meet on January 13, 2020 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 401 W Summit Hill Drive.

Anyone interested in the topic is welcome. 

Dr. Peter Thornton, Oak Ridge National laboratory, Climate Change Science Institute and the Environmental Sciences Division, will be the speaker. His speech title will be “What observations and models tell us about likely future trajectories for Earth’s climate system” 

Many people profess unbelief (or indifference) in climate change- this meeting will provide an opportunity to learn the facts necessary to help people who profess unbelief have a clear understanding of where the climate models originate and how reliable they are. This really is the crucial critical challenge for this generation.

Dr.  Thornton studies the interactions of land ecosystems with all other components of the Earth’s climate system, including biogeochemical and physical  land-atmosphere feedbacks, and interactions with human systems.     Dr. Thornton  has been a member of the scientific staff at ORNL since 2008 and he  also serves as a mentor to several technology projects within the Oak Ridge Public Schools, and serves as a board member for the Oak Ridge Public Schools Education Foundation.

 
Comments Off on January 2020 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

Posted by on January 1, 2020 in Meetings

 

December 2019 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

On December 9, 2019 Dr. Jack Dongarra, Prof., Min H. Kao Department of Electrical Engineering, UT will speak about ” The fastest computers.”

Jack Dongarra received a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Chicago State University in 1972 and a Master of Science in Computer Science from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1973. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the University of New Mexico in 1980. He worked at the Argonne National Laboratory until 1989, becoming a senior scientist.

He now holds an appointment as University Distinguished Professor of Computer Science in the Computer Science Department at the University of Tennessee, has the position of a Distinguished Research Staff member in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Turing Fellow in the Computer Science and Mathematics Schools at the University of Manchester, and an Adjunct Professor in the Computer Science Department at Rice University.

He specializes in numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, the use of advanced-computer architectures, programming methodology, and tools for parallel computers. His research includes the development, testing and documentation of high quality mathematical software.

He has contributed to the design and implementation of the following open source software packages and systems: EISPACK, LINPACK, the BLAS, LAPACK, ScaLAPACK, Netlib, PVM, MPI, NetSolve, Top500, ATLAS, and PAPI. He has published approximately 300 articles, papers, reports and technical memoranda and he is coauthor of several books.

He was awarded the IEEE Sid Fernbach Award in 2004 for his contributions in the application of high performance computers using innovative approaches; in 2008 he was the recipient of the first IEEE Medal of Excellence in Scalable Computing; in 2010 he was the first recipient of the SIAM Special Interest Group on Supercomputing’s award for Career Achievement; in 2011 he was the recipient of the IEEE Charles Babbage Award; and in 2013 he was the recipient of the ACM/IEEE Ken Kennedy Award for his leadership in designing and promoting standards for mathematical software used to solve numerical problems common to high performance computing. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and SIAM and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering.

 
Comments Off on December 2019 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

Posted by on November 11, 2019 in Meetings

 

November 2019 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

November 4: John Halliwell will  speak about electric vehicles with focus on the charging infrastructure.  “Where Are We On The Road To An Electric Transportation Future”
John Halliwell is team member in the Electric Transportation Group of EPRI where his focus is smart charging and infrastructure development for plug-in electric vehicles. He joined EPRI in 2007 and has been active in the electric transportation space since 2008. John is the current chair of the SAE J1772 Electric Vehicle Conductive Charge Coupler Task Force and the SAE AE-7D Aircraft Energy Storage and Charging Committee. He has broad experience in design and application of electronic circuits and electronic systems.

Mr. Halliwell received Bachelor of Science and Master of Science Degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

I, Bob Scott, Technical Society secretary, have a 2014 Ford Fusion Energi with a 5 kilowatt hour rechargeable battery. It will go about 20 miles on a charge with the power from KUB costing about 50 cents. The car is a hybrid and it gets almost 50 miles per gallon of gasoline after the rechargeable battery is depleted. My charger is plugged into a 110 volt circuit and it takes about 5 hours to charge the battery. I could get a 220 volt charger and cut the charging time in half but Ford charges about $800 for a 220 volt charger.

You may wonder why you don’t see cars plugged into charging stations- like at Cracker Barrel. In Tennessee I might pay 6 cents per minute for the time I am hooked to the charging station and it might take two hours – or $7.20- for a 5 kilowatt hour charge that would get me about 20 miles- which is less than I get with a half a gallon of gasoline. In other states they charge for the power and not the hookup time. Improved- or radically different- electric vehicle charging regulations, infrastructure and technology can make a big difference in moving our society to mostly electric vehicles.

And maybe we can do something about it. Come to our meeting and find out.

Future Technical Society programs:

December 9: Jack Dongarra, Prof., Min H. Kao Department of Electrical Engineering, UT: The fastest computers.

 
Comments Off on November 2019 Meeting of the Technical Society of Knoxville

Posted by on October 14, 2019 in Meetings